Grieving is the process of adjusting to change. It is a journey rather than a destination. Many people believe that they will go through specific grieving stages but, in reality, most people go in and out of grief as they adjust to life without the person who has died.

This can be one of the most momentous changes in a person’s life. It takes a great deal of energy, and most people find it arduous and challenging.

Adjusting to loss may entail learning new skills or taking on new tasks and responsibilities, such as cooking, managing finances, living alone and making decisions alone.

Seeking Help

Most people cope with grief through the support of family and friends. Others benefit from meeting other recently bereaved people who are not part of their family or close circle of friends. Some people find that, at first, they do not want support but then later change their mind.

Bereavement Services 

  • Individual bereavement support and counselling
  • Individual counselling for children and young people
  • Children’s and young people’s bereavement group (age 5-15, run over a weekend)
  • One day psycho-educational group for parents which runs concurrently with the children’s bereavement group session
  • Information booklets
  • Invitation to an Evening of Remembrance three to five months post bereavement in Harold’s Cross or the Remembrance Services in Blackrock

The bereavement service is open to all people who have experienced a significant death in OLH&CS.