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So far olh has created 26 blog entries.

Palliative Medicine Grand Rounds

Enquiry

Palliative Medicine Grand Rounds

Who Can Attend?
Postgraduate physicians.
Professionals from other healthcare disciplines are welcome to attend; this does not include members of the general public.

Palliative Medicine Grand Rounds is a weekly postgraduate physician education meeting. It is held on Friday at 8am in the Lecture Theatre of the Education & Research Centre.

Click here for videos of previous Grand Rounds talks and more

By | April 1st, 2017|Categories: Course, Palliative|0 Comments

Graduate Diploma/Certificate/Masters in Palliative Care (with UCD)

By | March 31st, 2017|Categories: Course, Palliative|0 Comments

Management of Intra-Articular and Soft Tissue Injection Techniques

Enter details below for more information

Online applications to nmhs@ucd.ie (module code for Jan entry x738)

If you wish to be directed to the UCD website please click on the following link

Professional Certificate Management of Intra-articular and Soft Tissue Injection Techniques

For full information on each module complete the details here.

By | March 23rd, 2017|Categories: Course|0 Comments

Sacred Art of Living & Dying: Transforming Spiritual Pain 2018

Personal and / or Professional Spiritual Development

Transforming Spiritual Pain is one of the four units of The Sacred Art of Living and Dying. This world renowned programme has been running at Our Lady’s Hospice since 2008 and consists of four stand-alone units.

Each unit comprises of a two-day workshop followed by five small study group sessions, called Circles of Trust.  These two-hour monthly meetings are held in various locations around Ireland and designed to maximize integration of learning into daily practice.  Programmes are a creative blend of instruction, hands-on experience, multimedia presentation, personal reflection and creative rituals from the world’s great wisdom traditions.

The programme will enable participants to:

  • Explore the nature and inter-relationship of human health and suffering and the universal aspects of meaning, forgiveness, hope & relationship.
  • Live with enhanced purpose and meaning through all the stages and transitions of living and dying and accompany others to do so.
  • Connect or reconnect the ‘soul and role’ in their lives.

Various Continuing Professional Development / Accreditation

Enter your details below to receive further information

By | March 22nd, 2017|Categories: Course, Spirituality|0 Comments

Volunteer Driver

Location: Dublin South City, County and Wicklow
Reports to: Volunteer Coordinator

Main Purpose:

To drive patients, and on occasion visitors, to and from Our Lady’s Hospice & Care Services, Harold’s Cross and Blackrock and to carry out driving assignments as arranged by the Hospice Volunteer Coordinators.

Skills Required:

• Valid full driver’s license and safe driving record
• Comprehensive Insurance
• Access to a vehicle that is roadworthy, reliable, clean and suitable for client’s needs i.e. that a person with limited mobility can get in and out of vehicle without too much stress
• No health conditions that may impair ability to drive safely

Responsibilities:

• To provide patient transport for Our Lady’s Hospice & Care Services and Blackrock Hospice Day Hospice. This service will include where necessary and appropriate all areas within both hospices.
• Prior to patients/clients appointments drivers will be given as much notice as possible regarding collection times etc. When necessary drivers may be given confidential information relating to the patients name and appointments.
• To make patients/relatives feel comfortable at all times e.g. gentle conversation
• To be a representative of the Hospice by having a friendly, sensitive and courteous manner in all dealings with patients, staff and the public
• To comply with legislation by keeping your car in legally good condition while driving safely and competently at all times
• All drivers must ensure they have written confirmation from their insurance companies stating they are covered to carry Hospice patients. This must be renewed on an annual basis. Drivers must check this is maintained as a priority.
• To comply with Risk and Safety Policy you will be allocated one to two patients per journey – depending upon the physical and medical condition of the patients you are asked to carry. In a situation or circumstance where you deem it unsafe to carry a second patient in your car do please inform the Volunteer Coordinator. We will insure your decision is respected at all times.

• If collecting patients for hospice appointments, be punctual at all times
• Ensure you have a map or clear directions to the persons house
• It is useful to keep a “Drivers Emergency Pack” in your car at all times, in the event of a patient becoming nauseous. Ask the Volunteer Coordinator for a pack at any stage.
• To maintain contact with Volunteer Coordinator while on duty in the event of being delayed, or any emergency while on hospice duty but do not use mobile while driving.
To honour confidentiality at all times
• To attend volunteer meetings whenever possible and keep informed re services at Our Lady’s Hospice & Care Services
• To abide by Our Lady’s Hospice & Care Services and Blackrock Hospice Policies and attend mandatory training as required e.g. patient handling, manual handling etc.
• Do not handle any money belonging to patients/residents.
• Do not offer any physical contact beyond hand holding: do not visit outside volunteer hours:
• Only carry out your role as requested by the Volunteer Co-Ordinator and refrain from fulfilling another role in the patient’s life eg:
□ regular shopping
□ visiting person in their home
□ continuing to visit the family following the death of the patient
□ looking after the property of a patient
NB Drivers must comply with Data Protection legislation in relation to personal details of patients given specifically for the purpose of transportation. They must sign an Agreement to abide by the receiving and disposing of personal information.

Additional Personal Qualities:

• Good communication skills
• Be responsible in all duties carried out
• Be flexible and adaptable
• Be reliable and trustworthy
• Be willing to work on your own and/or as part of a team

Personal Support:

• Refer to the “Drivers Tips” Leaflet for any further details regarding your role, incidents, assisting patients etc
• Induction, training and supervision for this role will be provided.
Contact Details:
Walter Walsh, Volunteer Coordinator mobile: 085 7110443

This role description may be subject to alteration or alternative duties following appropriate risk assessment and consultation between the Volunteer and Our Lady’s Hospice & Care Services.

By | February 13th, 2017|Categories: Volunteer Roles|0 Comments

Reception Volunteer – Blackrock Hospice

Location: Blackrock Hospice
Reports to: Nurse on Duty
Volunteer Coordinator
Time Commitment: 9am until 3pm (Saturday & Sunday)

Main Purpose:

Volunteers welcome patients, families, staff and visitors into Blackrock Hospice on Saturday and Sunday. They are the first person to greet all visitors. Volunteers are required to be in Blackrock Hospice by 9am until 3pm approximately on their requested day.

Skills Required:

• Good communication skills
• No health conditions that may impair ability to interact with patients

Duties:

• On arrival check if the Home Care Nurse is on duty. She may be working on site or on house calls. Her number and extension numbers are in the book in the basket beside the cash register. It is a good idea to have these in front of you.
• If there was no receptionist prior to your arrival, the telephone will have been diverted to the Nurses’ station, cancel this diversion.
• Full phone instructions are located on the chart in front of you beside the computer screen. Additional information regarding switchboard instructions (i.e.: transfer calls, log calls etc.) are also located here.
• There is a signing in book for visitors at reception (Health, Safety and Fire Regulations) When visitors are coming for the first time walk them directly to the Nurses’ station.
• A receipt must be given for any donations given to you by the public.
• The receipt book is in the second drawer beside the monitor, cash/cheque to be put in to an envelope and placed in the safe slot on the desk.

Responsibilities:

• To communicate, in confidence, directly with the Volunteer Coordinator any issues or concerns you may have
• To be flexible in your role as a volunteer
• To be a representative of the Hospice by having a friendly, sensitive and courteous manner in all dealings with visitors, patients, staff and the public
• Be punctual at all times
• To alert ward and/or security in case of emergency
• To honour confidentiality at all times
• To attend volunteer meetings whenever possible and keep informed of services in Our Lady’s Hospice & Care Services
• To abide by Our Lady’s Hospice & Care Services Policies and attend mandatory training as required e.g. Hand Hygiene, Manual Handling, Child Protection, Protection of Older People
• The use of mobile phones is restricted while on duty and do not give your number to any patient or their family member
• The taking of photographs of patients is strictly forbidden
• No food to be consumed while on duty
• Do not engage in physical contact beyond hand holding: do not visit outside volunteer hours
• Only carry out your role as requested by the Volunteer Co-Ordinator and refrain from fulfilling another role in the patient’s life eg:
o Shopping on regular basis
o Visiting person in their home
o Continuing to visit the family following the death of the patient
o Looking after the property of a patient

Additional Personal Qualities:

• Good communication skills
• Be responsible in all duties carried out
• Be flexible and adaptable to tasks at hand
• Be reliable and trustworthy
• Be willing to work on your own

Personal Support:
• Induction, training and supervision for this role will be provided.

Contact Details:
Blackrock Hospice Reception: 206 4000
Volunteers Office 406 8822 / 406 8898

This role description may be subject to alteration or alternative duties following appropriate risk assessment and consultation between the Volunteer and Our Lady’s Hospice & Care Services.

By | February 13th, 2017|Categories: Volunteer Roles|0 Comments

Patient Care Volunteer – Harold’s Cross

Location: Our Lady’s Hospice & Care Services, Harold’s Cross
Reports to: Volunteer Coordinator
Time Commitment: Flexible depending on day/shift

Main Purpose:

Volunteers are scheduled for morning, afternoon or evening roles from Monday to Sunday on a day that suits their availability. All new volunteers will be accompanied by an experienced volunteer. Under normal circumstances Volunteers do not go into the wards before 10am as residents are getting dressed.

The morning programme (9.30am – 1pm) consists of some of the following:

• Escorting patients to/from church and therapies
• Escorting patients to/from wards to the X-Ray Department
• Assisting patients with meals and drinks on the wards
• Accompanying patients to external medical/dental appointments
• Assist at OT activities i.e. Baking, Art, Gardening etc

The afternoon programme (2pm – 3.30pm approx) consists of the following:

• Patient social activities i.e Skittles, Bingo, Music etc
• Accompanying patients to external medical/dental appointments
The Dinner Programme in the evening consists of assisting patients with meals and drinks on the wards (4.15pm – 5.15pm)

The evening programme (7.15pm – 8.30pm approx) is as follows:

• Providing evening tea/coffee drinks on the wards
On a daily basis, staff, in consultation with volunteers, prioritise patients that require assistance at lunchtime and dinner according to their level of needs.

Please note: On a Saturday and Sunday, tea/coffee drinks begin on the ward at 10am and the mass is at 11am. The lunch schedule remains the same at 12.30am.

Skills Required:

• Good communication skills
• Flexibility of location/ward

Responsibilities:

• To be assigned to a specific ward and/or experienced volunteer upon arrival, as part of the ECU, Palliative Care rota’s as directed by the Volunteer Coordinator
• To communicate directly with the Volunteer Coordinator any issues, concerns you have, in confidence, regarding your role, staff or other volunteers so that a solution can be found
• To assist all patients with feeding/drinking where required under consultation with staff, on all wards
• To be flexible in your role as a volunteer as you may be assigned alternative roles on your day (escorting patients, assigned to another ward or patient)
• To offer companionship and time to patients/residents
• To support patients through enjoyable activities such as reading, talking and singing etc.
• To be a representative of the Hospice by having a friendly, sensitive and courteous manner in all dealings with visitors, patients, staff and the public
• To comply with any changes to ward rules/legislation, as directed by the Volunteer Coordinator and/or Ward Manager
• Be punctual at all times
• To communicate with the Volunteer Office if/when you cannot arrive on your designated day/shift so that the Volunteer Coordinator can ensure all wards/roles are fulfilled on the day
• To alert staff and/or Volunteer Coordinator in case of emergency on Ward
• To honour confidentiality at all times
• To attend volunteer meetings whenever possible and keep informed re services and Our Lady’s Hospice & Care Services
• To abide by Our Lady’s Hospice & Care Services Policies and complete mandatory training either online or on hospice grounds e.g. patient care, manual handling, Protection of the Older Person, Hand Hygiene The use of mobile phones is restricted while on duty. The taking of photographs of patients/residents is strictly forbidden
• Do not handle any money belonging to a patient/resident
• Do not offer any physical contact beyond hand holding: do not visit outside volunteer hours
• Only carry out your role as requested by the Volunteer Co-Ordinator and refrain from fulfilling another role in the patient’s life eg:
o regular shopping
o visiting person in their home
o continuing to visit the family following the death of patient
o looking after the property of a patient

Additional Personal Qualities:

• Communication skills
• Be responsible in all duties carried out
• Be flexible and adaptable to tasks at hand
• Be reliable and trustworthy
• Be willing to work on your own and/or as part of a team Personal Support:
• Induction, training and supervision for this role will be provided.


Personal Support:

• Induction, training and supervision for this role will be provided.
• Hand-outs for this role are available from the Volunteers Office to assist you. They include: “Assisting a Resident with Eating/Drinking” and “Practical Steps for Trolley Usage in Anna Gaynor House, CRU and Palliative Care”

Contact Details:

Volunteers Office Tel: 406 8822 / 406 8898
This role description may be subject to alteration or alternative duties following appropriate risk assessment and consultation between the Volunteer and Our Lady’s Hospice & Care Services.

By | February 13th, 2017|Categories: Volunteer Roles|0 Comments

Volunteers at Harold’s Cross

May Casey, Fundraising and Patient Care volunteer
The Bingo Group
The Secret Garden – Marymount Ward – Bernadette McKeon
Music and Song

‘What do you DO?’ is the most frequently asked question when it emerges in conversation that I am a volunteer at Our Lady’s Hospice. How to answer? I usually ask ‘How long have you got?’

Many volunteers have organised lives so they arrange a certain day and time which they give to the Hospice and can be relied on to be there and take care of the appointed task. These stalwart volunteers are an integral part of the organisation and contribute hugely to the life style and comfort of the patients.

I, on the other hand, do not have an organised life. Whether I am lucky or unlucky that nobody outside is making demands on my time, I am free to spend a lot of it in Harold’s Cross and as a result I have enjoyed many diverse tasks.

When I first joined in 1998 it was at the beginning of that year’s Light up a Life campaign. This has always been the biggest of the fundraisers and has now grown to become a really huge event. With others I open post, take phone calls, fill orders for Christmas cards, ornaments etc., enter data on the computer, meet the public in the run up to it and on the day – hectic and immensely satisfying! The annual Coffee Morning demands similar attention, taking and filling orders and even sometimes helping to deliver packs.

Other fundraising campaigns – Sunflower Day, Women’s’ Mini Marathon, Spring Raffle, Annual Trek (in some interesting foreign spot) the annual summer event Little Flower of Life (at Blackrock Hospice) and the many individual events the public are kind enough to run for the hospice – need organisation and support of one kind or another and volunteers can usually assist.

Away from the fundraising office I have entered information on computers, worked with reorganising files and made up information packs for new patients. I’ve also helped in the Library, the Coffee Shop, given hand care at the Day Hospice, distributed morning teas or coffee in the Palliative Care Unit, traced information in the archive, helped with weekly accounts and, more recently, helped a little in the Heritage Centre .

I love it all and consider myself so lucky to be a very small part of the organisation.

My time is spent in a great environment, I meet and have made friends with lovely people, I’m occupied and, hopefully, of some small use.

The Bingo Group

Adrian Beirne, John Breheny, Bernadette McKeon, Eileen Goodwin, Pauline Maguire and Marie Louise Bermingham

Volunteer Eithne Wynnes started the Bingo group 12 years ago and the group has continued ever since, every Thursday at Anna Gaynor House with our Extended Care Unit residents. A lovely connection has developed between volunteers and residents over time, singing, playing piano and playing Bingo together.

Pauline Maguire has been volunteering with the Hospice for 15 years and with the Bingo group since it began 12 years ago. Having lived in America and volunteered there, Pauline wanted to continue volunteering when she returned to Ireland and found a good fit with the Hospice – ‘I just love being with the people here; they’re so appreciative of anything we do and the staff are too. I think it’s important to feel you have a purpose in life and doing this, I do feel that.’

Eileen Goodwin, like many of the volunteers at Our Lady’s Hospice, had a family member who passed away here and wanted to give something back through volunteering her time; ‘I like how you get to know the people here and build up relationships with residents. I’ve also made friends with the other volunteers so it’s not a duty; it’s a pleasure to be here! I think there is a nice peaceful atmosphere, it’s good for the residents and it’s good for us too.’

John Breheny had a friend who was looked after by the Hospice 25 years ago and he was so impressed by the care his friend received he decided that when he retired he would give back by volunteering. That was 10 years ago and John has been here ever since helping in the wards and with the bingo group. ‘This is the residents’ last home in this world and it is important to make that the best home it can be for them. I think the volunteers get a lot of praise, but I feel great respect for the care work assistants who do the real work of caring day in day out, so I try to do as good a job as they do in caring about the residents. When I first arrived here, I thought I would be helping in palliative care but instead I was sent to the Extended Care Unit. I didn’t know how I would get on, but to my surprise discovered I had a natural bent for it. I didn’t know that about myself! I would say to anyone thinking of volunteering the only way to know if it is for you is to give it a try – everyone is different but you might find something you’d never considered before would suit you, like I did.’

The Secret Garden – Marymount Ward – Bernadette McKeon

When my family had grown up and moved out, I found there were only so many things I could do in the house, I was bored and wanted to get out and do something! I love helping people and decided to see if the Hospice needed volunteers – that was 8 years ago and from day one, it has been a great experience. Every Friday I visit the Hospice to help patients in Marymount Ward with volunteer John Breheny. After I’d been there a while and got to know the staff and residents better, Chris Gavin one of the care workers in the ward asked me to help with a garden she was creating on the patio for residents. We started working on it when it was just a bare patio. Since then, we’ve planted flowers and shrubs in pots, we’ve decorated it with lights and ornaments and we’ve had window boxes made so that residents in bed can see the flowers through their window, even if they can’t come outside. We also have a seating area with parasols where residents like to meet and talk – sometimes it’s hard to get them to come back inside as they prefer to sit there than in the Day Room! I enjoy gardening and it’s nice to just get stuck in and help where help is needed. I usually bring a little bag of my gardening tools with me and leave it over the wall into the patio when I’m on my way up the drive to the Hospice, then I pop in to do a bit of watering or weeding after I have finished on the ward with John. It’s great to see how it has come on over the years – it makes such a big difference to the residents’ quality of life and they also enjoy getting involved, helping to plant bulbs for spring etc.

Music and Song

Over the years we have been privileged to meet so many wonderful musicians and singers who have generously volunteered their time to entertain the patients and residents in Harold’s Cross and Blackrock. Whether it’s classical, modern, popular, ballads, sing-alongs, choirs, ukuleles or individual performers the enjoyment music brings is visible in the tapping of feet, clapping of hands and swaying to the rhythm of the melody. Music evokes memories, happiness, sadness but above all pleasure and we are indebted to those who bring their talent for the entertainment of others. To quote Shakespeare ‘if music be the food of love, play on’ – and what a joy it all is!

By | January 27th, 2017|Categories: Volunteer Story|0 Comments

Student Volunteers

International and Summer Student Volunteers
An Experience That Opened Our Eyes

Over the last number of years, the Volunteer Office has taken a small number of international students during the summer months as part of the Volunteer Student Programme.

International students come from various colleges in North America for a period of 8 – 10 weeks as part of their internships or academic exchange programme. Linking with organisations such as EUSA and CAPA, students are vetted, sent all the necessary volunteer documentation and have a phone interview with one of the Volunteer Coordinators before they begin. Every student placement and reason for coming here is unique – particularly as they are so far from home – and we are delighted to welcome them into the programme each year. They learn about all aspects of volunteering, Irish culture and for them the unique experience of an overseas placement.

All students during the summer months receive the same mandatory and on-site training as every volunteer in OLH&CS. The summer and international students bring huge personalities, great enthusiasm and experience into the summer programme and are a valuable asset to our team.

All enquiries should be made through the Volunteer Office.

Volunteers pictured during their summer placements are Tia Goodwin (Dublin), Mackenzie Klaver (Kansas) and Mallorie Gagnon (New York)

An Experience That Opened Our Eyes

I first started coming to volunteer at Our Lady’s Hospice & Care Services in January 2015. I was participating in the Gaisce (Presidents Award) as part of transition year and I needed to do community work somewhere. My friend suggested that I should come to the hospice as she had been doing volunteering there since September the previous year. On my first day at the hospice I had no idea what to expect and was quite daunted at the prospect. Having Hannah come in with me really helped. When I came into the Volunteer Office, I was greeted by a lady called Niamh who was one of the volunteer coordinators. Niamh went over some of the rules and training and told me what I would be doing there. Seeing Niamh’s friendly face made me less nervous as I began to realise that the hospice was not a scary place, but a place filled with friendly staff and a welcoming atmosphere.

Once a week from then on, Hannah and I came down to the hospice for an hour to help with feeding at tea time. The more I went, the more comfortable I became with the work we did. Over time I got to know lots of the people’s name who stayed and worked there. Sometimes when I would be assisting a patient with their tea, they started to shout at me but I understood that it’s not their fault and they mightn’t realise what they are doing. I’ve learnt that you need to have thick skin! After I finished transition year, I kept volunteering at the hospice during the summer. I didn’t want to just have to stop going anymore so I continued on.

The hospice has opened my eyes to many things that I never even thought about before. It has taught me to have more respect and tolerance for our older generation. Every time I come home from the hospice I feel fulfilled and like I’ve spent my day doing something worthwhile and I haven’t sat around on my phone all day. There is never a dull moment being a volunteer at Our Lady’s Hospice whether I am helping with baking, skittles, assisting with feeding or sitting down in the restaurant enjoying a cup of free coffee – another perk of being a volunteer!

I am so glad I got to become a volunteer at the hospice and I would definitely recommend it to anyone else.

Eva Kirwan, age 16

The day finally came; the first day of my work experience in Our Lady’s Hospice & Care Services. For months people had told me that choosing this would be an experience and it would be an eye opener. I thought that it was a great chance to give back to the community and something that is out of my comfort zone.

As soon as we pulled up outside the beautifully built building, a wave of nervousness came over me. It was subtle but they say nerves are not such a bad thing. I made my way straight for the Volunteer Office and the minute I walked in the room, I was immediately greeted by the volunteer coordinator Niamh. Her warm welcome and calm vibe soon washed my nerves away. We started into an introduction on how to correctly wash your hands, manoeuvre a wheelchair safety and help feed a patient with ease. I was most sceptical about the wheelchair pushing as I am quite clumsy. As soon as the introduction lesson was over we headed over to the wards.

We soon discovered that there are four wards in the Extended Care Unit. From the very first day I was on St. Michael’s Ward which I couldn’t enjoy more. The day would start off by collecting patients and wheeling them to Mass at 10am. I enjoyed this part as you would get an opportunity to chat to the patients. After this we would go to have a quick coffee break and then collect the residents/patients from mass. When all the patients were back safety in their rooms, we would then get the tea, soup and biscuit trolley and go around each of the rooms giving out refreshments. This is a lovely activity as you get to chat with the residents and learn their personalities. After this task was completed we would collect the patients for baking. I absolutely loved this activity because as well as being fun, it helped the patients with their hand coordination and was something different for them to do. Each week it seemed like they were really enjoying it.

Soon after this activity it was time for lunches and we would go to our allocated ward. Feeding was always an aspect of this work experience that people don’t enjoy but I really didn’t mind it as I knew it was an important element. It was a relaxing time of the day and helped you to get to know the residents better. When finished, we would go for lunch and then set up the afternoon activity which was skittles, bingo or crossword. This was the most enjoyable part of the day as a good few patients would get together to play these games. I have so many fond memories of these afternoons like on our last day it was a big Christmas party and they had a singer in which all the residents loved.

I learnt so much in my 13 weeks in Our Lady’s Hospice that I will carry with me my whole life. When people said that it would be an eye opener, they couldn’t have been more correct. It opened my eyes in so many ways. It makes you see life differently and makes you want to live it to its fullest because life is short and everything goes by so quickly. During my time there I build up many bonds with the patients and will never forget them as they are what made it special for me. Just knowing I made at least one person smile during their last few days or even hours was the most rewarding thing of all.

Hannah Thomson, age 16

Eva and Hannah

By | January 26th, 2017|Categories: Volunteer Story|0 Comments